News transcripts - Huggins, 19th century

Source: Belfast Commercial Chronicle, 9 September 1816. "Lands near Dungannon, to be sold," re: Samuel Carson Huggins, Ivy Lodge. Digital copy online at the British Newspaper Archive, www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk (accessed 2015-12-27, by subscription). Transcribed by Alison Kilpatrick.
Please cite your sources.

Lands Near Dungannon
To be Sold,
The Farm of Ivy Lodge, formerly occupied by Samuel Huggins, beautifully situated on the Mail Coach Road between that Town and Moy, containing about 30 Acres of excellent Land, held under Lord Viscount Northland, for one good Life, at 26s. per Acre; on which there is a good Dwelling-House, with good Offices, fit for the  reception of a genteel family.
If not disposed of by Private Sale (of which due notice will be given), it will be Sold by Public Auction, on the Premises, on Saturday the 14th September, at the hour of Twelve o’Clock.    Proposals will be received (if by Letter, post-paid), by John Shaw, Dreemore; or James Pillar, Culkeran [?], both near Moy; who will close a bargain with any Person  who will give a fair value.    The Purchaser can be accommodated with Eight Acres of Oats and Four of Potatoes; which if not disposed of by Private Sale, will on the day above mentioned, by also Sold by Auction.

Source: Belfast Commercial Chronicle, 26 February 1817. Insolvent debtor notice re: Oliver Allen. Online at the British Newspaper Archive, www.british-newspaperarchive.co.uk (accessed 2015-11-19, by subscription). Transcribed by Alison Kilpatrick.

The Brilliant Portable Blacking.
  This Blacking, though nearly one-half Cheaper than that imported in Jars, requires only to be used to prove its superiority for brilliancy of Polish, perfection in Blackness, and softening quality for the Leather.
  A Pot of this Blacking is sold for Ten Pence, which being blended in a Pint of Soft Water, makes Liquid of a proper consistence; or it may be mixed in small proportions, at the option of the user.
——Prepared only by
  John M'Kenny,
  Book-Seller, Newry;
Sold also by the following respectable Persons, viz.——
[Transcriber's note: Included in a list of a couple of dozen individuals at various places:] Dungannon.——Mr. Huggins, Mr. Thos. White, and Mr. John White.

Source: Belfast Commercial Chronicle, 26 February 1817. Insolvent debtor notice re: Oliver Allen. Online at the British Newspaper Archive, www.british-newspaperarchive.co.uk (accessed 2015-11-19, by subscription). Transcribed by Alison Kilpatrick.

  I Hereby give Notice, that my Petition hath been presented to, and my Schedule and Oath filed with T.L. Stewart, Esq. Seneschal of the Manor Court of Belfast, in the County of Antrim, in order to my being discharged out of custody and from the demands of my Creditors, pursuant to the different Statutes made for the relief of Insolvent Debtors in Ireland; and I further give notice and declare, that I am ready and willing to be fully examined touching the justice of my conduct to each and every of my Creditors; and that I am to be brought up before the Seneschal of said Court, on Friday the 14th day of March, at the Hour of Ten o'Clock in the Forenoon, to be heard on my said Petition, and that all my several Creditors do then and there attend, and shew cause (if any they can) why I should not be discharged from my confinement——Dated this 21st day of February, 1817.
  Oliver Allen,
  Now confined in the Marshalsea of Belfast,
  in the County of Antrim.
To Samuel Thompson and Thomas Coyle, of Belfast, detaining Creditors; John and Jackson Harrington, of Moy; Richard Irvin, and Adam Crozier, of Caledon; William Pringle, Glasslough; Richard O'Bryans, Newry; Thompson Huggins, Dungannon; and to all other Creditors, or claiming to be Creditors of the above-named Oliver Allen.

Source: Dublin Evening Post, 27 February 1817. Insolvent debtor notice re: John Huggins. Online at the British Newspaper Archive, british-newspaperarchive.co.uk (accessed 2015-11-19, by subscription). Transcribed by Alison Kilpatrick.

Insolvent Debtors. ...
  I Hereby give Notice, that my Petition hath been presented to, and my Schedule and Oath filed in his Majesty's Court of King's Bench, in Ireland, in order to my being discharged out of custody, and from the demands of my Creditors, pursuant to an Act of Parliament, made in the 53d year of his present Majesty's Reign, entitled "An Act for the Relief of Insolvent Debtors in Ireland;" and of an Act of Parliament made in the 54th year of his present Majesty's Reign, entitled "An Act to amend an Act made in the last Session of Parliament for the Relief of Insolvent Debtors in Ireland;" and also of an Act of Parliament made in the 56th year of his present Majesty's Reign, entitled "An Act to amend an Act of the 53d year of his present Majesty's Reign, for the Relief of Insolvent Debtors in Ireland."——And I further give notice and declare, that I am ready and willing to be fully examined touching the justice of my conduct towards each and every of my Creditors.——And take Notice, that the matter of my said Petition will be taken into consideration by the next going Judges of Assize for the North West Circuit, at an Assizes to be held in Omagh, in and for the County of Tyrone, according to the order of the Court for that purpose.——Dated this 26th day of February, 1817.
  John Huggins,
  Confined in the Gaol of Dungannon.
The following are the Creditors of John Huggins:
  Wm. Mathews, of Baltimore, in North America; Edward Jones, of the City of London, merchant; Robert Publes, and Anthony Lucy, of the City of Armagh, merchants, Insolvent's detaining Creditors. Denis Caulfield, Assignee of Wm. Phelps, late of Belfast, County of Antrim, merchant; Robert M'Dowal,  and Henry Rowan, Assignee of Thomas Herron, late of Belfast, County of Antrim, merchant; John Phelps, of Moyallen, in the County of Down, merchant; Robert Burke, and Robert Harman, of the City of Cork, merchants; Messrs. Craig, Fisher and Co. of Belfast, County of Antrim, merchants; Samuel Craig and Co. of Belfast, County of Antrim, merchants; and Wm. Hamilton, near Stewartstown, County of Tyrone, farmer, or his Endorsees; and to all other Creditors, or claiming to be Creditors, of said Insolvent.

Source: Dublin Evening Post, 17 May 1817. Insolvent debtor notice re: John Huggins. Online at the British Newspaper Archive, british-newspaperarchive.co.uk (accessed 2015-11-19, by subscription). Transcribed by Alison Kilpatrick.

Insolvent Debtors.
  We hereby give Notice, that our Petitions have been presented to, and our Schedules and Oaths filed in his Majesty's Court of King's Bench, in Ireland, in order to our being discharged out of custody, and from the demands of our Creditors, pursuant to an Act of Parliament made in the 53d year of his present Majesty's Reign, entitled "An Act for the Relief of Insolvent Debtors in Ireland;" and also of an Act of Parliament made in the 54th year of his present Majesty's Reign, entitled ["]An Act to amend an Act made in the last Session of Parliament, for the Relief of Insolvent Debtors in Ireland;["] and also of an Act of Parliament made in the 56th year of his present Majesty's Reign, entitled "An Act to amend an Act of the 53d year of his present Majesty's Reign, for Relief of Insolvent Debtors in Ireland."——And we further give notice and declare, that we are ready and willing to be fully examined, touching the justice of our conduct to each and every of our Creditors. And take Notice, that pursuant to an order made in our said Petitions, the matter of our said Petitions will be taken into consideration by the said Court, on Saturday, the 7th day of June next, at the hour of ten o'clock in the forenoon, in order to our being discharged out of custody, and from the demands of our Creditors.——Dated this 16th day of May, 1817.
[included in a list of several names:] John Huggins.
Confined in the Four Courts Marshalsea.

Source: Dublin Morning Register, 8 October 1835. "Reception of the Lord Lieutenant in Strabane," re: signature of Samuel C. Huggins on Address. Digital copy online at www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk (accessed 2015-12-27).

Reception of the Lord Lieutenant in Strabane.
  On Monday, the 28th ult., a large concourse of the inhabitants of Strabane and the surrounding district, assembled in that town to witness the arrival of Lord Mulgrave, on his way from Derry to the metropolis, and pay a tribute of their respect and admiration to this popular representative of our most gracious Sovereign. The cheers and acclamations of the crowd were truly deafening. There could not have been less than five or six thousand persons present, although notice of his lordship's route through Strabane only arrived that morning. Three cheers for the emancipator of the slaves, the reformer of the Cork corporation, &c., greeted his lordship's departure, which was necessarily slow, owing to the density of the throng.

Address.
  To his Excellency Constantine Henry Earl of Mulgrave, Lord Lieutenant General and General Governor of Ireland.
  May it Please Your Excellency, We, the Roman Catholic Clergy and the inhabitants generally of Strabane and surrounding district, anxiously avail ourselves of your Excellency’s presence, to give expression to the feelings of respect and attachment which we entertain for you, as the representative of our gracious Sovereign, and of personal regard for yourself.
  We beg leave to assure your Excellency that, in common with the rest of Ireland, we hailed with delight your Excellency’s appointment as the ushering in of a brighter day for our long neglected and misgoverned country.
  The transcendent talents with which Providence has adorned your Lordship, and which shed a lustre around the viceregal throne of Ireland--—the uniform exercise of those talents in the cause of civil and religious liberty--—your appointment by a ministry, who are the first that have manifested a real wish to know and ameliorate the wrongs of Ireland--—impress us with a firm conviction that, under your Excellency’s mild and paternal sway, the sources of the evils which have afflicted this country will be dried up, and those who before had kept aloof from each other, actuated by party and sectarian prejudices, will forget their former dimensions, and join in one common effort for the amelioration of the country. We would consider ourselves wanting in our duty, did we omit this opportunity of giving expression to our grateful remembrance of the exertions of your illustrious ancestor in behalf of our ill-fated land, at a time when there were few to raise their voice in its favour.
  Long may your Excellency’s popular and truly patriotic government remain over us, to carry into execution those healing measures of reform which they have commenced; and when you retire——and may the day be far distant——you will carry with you the blessings of a grateful and emancipated people.
  Adopted at a meeting publicly convened, and signed on behalf of the clergy and inhabitants by
  Arthur M’Hugh, V.G.
  Dennis M’Devitt, C.C.
  Jeremiah Gill,
  Patrick Monaghan,
  James Porter,
  Francis O’Neill,
  Samuel C. Huggins.
  Strabane, September 28th, 1835.

To the Roman Catholic Clergy, and the Inhabitants of Strabane and the surrounding district.
  I beg the Roman Catholic Clergy, and the inhabitants generally of Strabane and the surrounding district, to believe that I am very sensible of the kindness which induced them to present to me this Address on my passing through Strabane. It is most gratifying to me that they should consider my appointment, as the representative of our most gracious Sovereign, one that is likely to be attended with beneficial results to Ireland; and I cordially thank them for the good wishes they express towards myself personally, and their confidence in his Majesty's present government.
  Mulgrave.
  Dublin Castle, 2d October, 1835.

Source: Derry Journal, 7 July 1839. "Perpetuity for Sale," re: Town Parks of Strabane, S.C. Huggins. Online at the British Newspaper Archive, www.british-newspaperarchive.co.uk (accessed 2015-11-19, by subscription). Transcribed by Alison Kilpatrick.

Perpetuity for Sale.
To be Sold.
  Twelve Acres, or thereabouts, of Land, in the Town Parks  of Strabane, the property of Mr. S.C. Huggins, held in Perpetuity, under the Marquis of Abercorn, at the Yearly Rent of £2 2s late Irish Currency. The lands are at present in the occupation of Under-Tenants, yielding a Profit Rent of about £40 a year; and, if well managed, would yield considerably more.
  Proposals will be received, on the part of Mr. Huggins, by Henry M’Cay, Solicitor, who will give the requisite information as to Title, and is authorised to close with a Purchaser, on a suitable offer being made.
  Strabane, May 4, 1839.

Source: Dublin Evening Packet, 28 December 1839. "Royal School of Dungannon," re: half-yearly examinations, [Samuel C.] Huggins. Online at the British Newspaper Archive, www.british-newspaperarchive.co.uk (accessed 2015-11-19, by subscription). Transcribed by Alison Kilpatrick.

Royal School of Dungannon.
The Rev. John R. Darley, A.M., Master.
The Half-Yearly Examinations were held on the 16th and 17th of December, when the following Rewards of Merit were adjudged:——
The Earl of Ranfurley's Premiums,
  For distinguished answering in the Entrance Course of Trinity College, to Patten and Moore 1us.
The Science Medals,
  To Leslie and Kennedy.
The Classical Medals,
  To Moore 1us, and M'Farland.
The Certificates,
  To Reilly, Mason, Beresford 1us, Patten, Wilcocks, and Kennedy, who on former occasions, obtained Medals.
The Testimoniums
  For general good conduct, diligence, and proficiency in their studies, to Mason, Wilcocks, Kennedy, Daunt, Leslie, Moore 1us and 2us, Patten, Boyd 1us, Dyas, Carroll, Colles, Hall, Higgin, Maunsell 2us, Higginbotham, Todd 1us, Twibill, Burns, Crozier 2us, Day, Tisdall, Dawson, Ussher, Simmons, M'Sorely, Dowse, Dickens.
The Premiums.
  The number of which obtained by each Pupil is annexed to his name——to Mason, 6; Wilcocks, 6; Kennedy, 6; Daunt, 6; Leslie, 7; Moore, 7; Patten, 6; Beresford 1us, 5; Beresford 2us, 2; Boyd 1us, 7; D'Arcy 1us, 4; D'Arcy 2us, 1; Dyas, 11; Lyle, 2; Percy, 7; Reilly, 11; Atkinson 1us, 3; Carroll, 13; Colles, 11; Crozier, 1 us, 4; Fouke, 2; Hall, 11; Higgin, 13; Higinbotham, 9; King, 9; Lowry, 3; Maunsell 2us, 9; M'Kee, 5; Monsarrat, 3; Todd 1us, 8; Twibill, 14; Burns, 8; Irwin, 6; Atkinson 2us, 1; Crozier, 2us, 5; Curry, 3; Day, 8; Hamilton, 6; Maunsell 1us, 2; Scott 1us, 7; Tisdall, 8; Todd 2us 5; Ussher, 3; Bolton, 5; Simmons, 3; Kough, 6; M'——ly [illegible], 9; Boyd 2us, 6; Burnell, 3; Corken, 3; Gumley, 2; Mann, 4; M'Farland, 5; Murphy, 4; Douse, 10; M'Neece, 3; Haig 1us, 5; Haig 2us, 3; Magee, 3; Moore 2us, 5; Smith, 3; White, 2; Young 1us; Young 2us, 2; Burtchell, 3; Darley, 3; Drought, 2; Pettigrew, 3; Scott 2us, 3; Scott 3us, 3; Stott, 3; Huggins, 1; Dickens, 3.
  The subjects of Examinations were, Scripture, Mechanics, Logic, Trigonometry, Algebra, Euclid, Hebrew, Greek, Latin, French, Composition in Verse and Prose, Elocution, Antiquities, Ancient and Modern Geography and History, Globes, Arithmetic, Drawing, Reading, Writing, English Grammar, Spelling.
  Daily Lectures, in the Morning and Evening, on the Scriptures, and Weekly Lectures on Natural Philosphy [sic], are given by the Principal. Twenty-four Collegiate Distinctions were obtained during the present year by former Pupils of Dungannon School, in Science, Classics, Hebrew, Latin Verse, Composition, and Divinity.
  Mr. Darley has lately published a Treatise on Homer, and will shortly publish a Treatise on the Grecian Drama, Greek Prosody, and Versification, &c., &c. Both works may be had from Messrs. Cumming, Hardy and Walker, &c., &c.
  The Vacation will terminate January 27.
  Dungannon College, Dec. 28, 1839.

Source: Belfast Commercial Chronicle, 7 July 1841. "Royal Belfast Academical Institution," re: premiums and certificates, [Samuel C.] Huggins. Online at the British Newspaper Archive, www.british-newspaperarchive.co.uk (accessed 2015-11-19, by subscription). Transcribed by Alison Kilpatrick.

Royal Belfast Academical Institution.
  The Schools were closed on Thursday, the 1st instant, when Premiums and Certificates were distributed in the Common Hall to the following young gentlemen:——
  Silver Medal to J.C. Steen (Pakenham-place.)
  Premiums to C.W. Shaw; J. Montgomery, (Locust-Lodge,) D. Baird, (Casino, Londonderry;) I.J. Murphy; W. Bragg, (Workington;) W. Hopkins, (Athboy;) J.J. Murphy, W. Simms, (Grove;) James Gray, (Graymount;) James Bristow; J. Wallace, (Downpatrick;) L. Kellett, (Rantavan;) C. Nash, (Hillsborough;) H. Thomson; W. Wallace; R. Carmichael, (Donaghadee); A. Gray, (Graymount;) N. Evans, (Castle-pollard); A. Falls, (Dungannon;) Thos. Steen, J. Simonton; T. Warreu [sic], (Knocknagoney;) J. Neill; W. Plunkett, (Fairy Mount,) and T. Sharp.  Bronze Medals from the Classical School to T. Brunker, T. Morgan, M. M'Kay, and J. Stewart, (Bushmills): from the Mathematical School to W. Carson, R. Holmes, (Stewart-town); J.J. Johnston, (Strabane), H. Murney, and W. Pirrie, (Conlig): from the English School to J. Cardona, (Denia, Spain), J.P. Henderson, G. Posnett, J. Riley, and J. Saunders, (Mobile, Alabama, U.S.): from the Writing School to J. Carmichael, (Donaghadee), H. Cleland, (Downpatrick), and E. Lockhart, (Lurgan); from the French School to John Gray, and J.W.T. Smith: from the Drawing School to J. Anderson and H. Montgomery, (Dunmurry.)  Certificates to John Boyd; John Clarke (Bermuda); C. Gavila (Denia, Spain); A. Montgomery (Mauritius); S. Martin (Killyleagh); C.E. M'Kay; R. Sweeny (Castlebellingham); R. Wallace (Newtownards); T. Knowles (Dundalk); James Clarke (Bermuda); James Eccles (Dublin); J. Posnett; R. Sproule (Millmount, Strabane); R. Bradshaw (Ardglass); G.M. Gibbs (Castlepollard); A.R. Hamilton (Killyleagh); W. Reid (Ballymoyer, N:hamilton); W.J. Blair (Ballymoney); J. Caughey; E. L'Estrange (Kilcummin); J. M'Keag; J. Bankhead; R. Christie; W. Cramsie; T. Dickson (Fintona); H. Gordon (New Orleans, United States); J. Kelly; S. Murphy (Rathfriland); W. Nash (Hillsborough); J. Spence; J. Thompson; H. Vance (New Orleans, U.S.); James Boyd; Joseph Bristow; F. Holmes (Stewartstown); S. Huggins (Strabane); S. Johnston (N:Kernahan, Londonderry); J. Knox (Ballymoney); W. Millar; J. M'Causland; F. Plunkett (Fairy Mount); J. Vint; C. White (Omagh); G. Boyce (Dublin); John Bristow; G. Ewart; C. Gibson; R. Greer (Bristol); R. Grimshaw (Linfield); J. Little; W.J. Millar; R. Montgomery (Mauritius); W. M'Comb; R. M'Kenzie; A. M'Minn (Herdstown, Donaghadee); N. Parsons (Templegowran, Newry), R. Reford; P. Rose; R. Steen; F. Tisdale (Bristol).  Natural History——(Entomology)——For a prize proposed by Robert Patterson, Esq.——J.A. Wallace; Robt. Steen; and Robert Sproule (all equal); A. Gray; and James Gray.  Prize Poems on Africa——J.J. Murphy; T. Sharp.  The Schools will re open on Tuesday, the 10th of August, when a punctual attendance is particularly requested.

Source: Belfast Commercial Chronicle, 2 July 1842. "Royal Belfast Academical Institution," re: premiums and certificates, [Samuel C.] Huggins. Online at the British Newspaper Archive, www.british-newspaperarchive.co.uk (accessed 2015-11-19, by subscription). Extract transcribed by Alison Kilpatrick.

Royal Belfast Academical Institution.
School Department.
  At the termination of the Examinations on Thursday last, Premiums and Certificates for diligence, good conduct and improvement, since the Christmas Recess, as ascertained by the weekly returns in the Secretary's book, were awarded as follows: ... Certificates to ... S. Huggins (Bushmount, Dungannon); ...

Source: Armagh Guardian, 29 May 1848. "Tenant Right. Great Demonstration at Dungannon," re: Mr. J. Huggins, Dungannon. Transcribed from the microfilm (British Library) by Alison Kilpatrick.

Tenant Right.
Great Demonstration at Dungannon.
  One of the most important meetings which have yet been held in the Province of Ulster, in reference to this question, took place on Thursday, in Dungannon. It was called by the Ulster Tenant Right Association, for the purpose of petitioning her Majesty to give her sanction to a measure for legalizing tenant right. It was held in the open air, in the Castle Grounds, and was attended by delegates, or representatives, from every Tenant Right Association in the Province.——There were about 10,000 persons assembled.
  Among those present were the following gentlemen:——Thomas M'Cullagh, Esq., J.P. Ballybay; S. M'C. Greer, Esq. Barrister; Dr. Dickson, Dungannon; W. Holmes, Esq., Solicitor; R. Falls, Esq. do.; J. Falls, Esq., Robert King, Esq., Annesley Lodge; Rev. C.L. Morell, Dungannon; Rev. D.G. Brown, Newtownhamilton; Rev. Joseph Acheson, Castlecaulfield; Dr. Dougherty, Garvagh; Dr. H. Cunningham, Derry; J. M'Knight, Esq. L.L.D. ditto; Dr. Devlin, Dungannon; Rev. F. Devlin, P.P. Donaghmore; Rev. D. Hughes, C.C. ditto; Rev. J. Coyne, C.C. Eglish; Rev. Thomas Cassidy, C.C. Clontibret; Rev. B. Weeney, P.P. Clonee; Rev. P. Quinn, P.P. Beragh; Rev. J. O'Doherty, Errigle; Rev. Mr. Quinn, P.P. Mullavelly; Rev. Mr. Fearon; [sic] C.C. Ballygawley; Rev. D. O'Doherty, P.P. Cappagh; W. Cochrane, Esq., S. Leathem, Esq., Derry; W.H. Leathem, Esq. Armagh; J. Harbison, Esq. Cookstown; Thomas Montgomery, Esq. Aughnacloy; J. Wiltshire, Esq. Armagh; A. Armstrong, Esq., Ballygawley; James Sloan, Esq., Moy; G. Sloan, jun. Esq., Coalisland; J. Slevin, Esq., Dungannon; Samuel Hughes, Esq., Dungannon; —— Jennings, Esq., Newry; Mr. Hurst, Dungannon; J. Brannigan, Dungannon; Mr. M'Geach, Cookstown; W. Glasgow, Cookstown; Mr. J. Dickson, Mr. M'Mahon, Dundalk; P. Dowdall, Dundalk; Mr. G. Conway, Dundalk; D. Anderson, Cookstown; Mr. W. Rodgers, Dungannon; Mr. Beatty, Dungannon; Mr. William M'Clelland, Dungannon; Mr. J. Huggins, Dungannon, &c., &c. ...

Transcriber's note: This article continues for 1-1/2 columns.

Source: Freeman's Journal, 26 November 1849. "Rolls Court—Saturday. Belmore v. Belmore," re: James Huggin. Online at the British Newspaper Archive, www.british-newspaperarchive.co.uk (accessed 2015-11-19, by subscription). Transcribed by Alison Kilpatrick.

Rolls Court——Saturday.
Belmore v. Belmore.
  Mr. Vance moved that James Huggin, who was in custody under an attachment from this court, should be discharged. It appeared from the statement of counsel that his client proposed to take a lease of forty acres of the estate which is the subject of the cause of Belmore v. Belmore, situate in the county Down, at 2l. an acre; that he gave the receiver the sum of 8l. 6s. to defray the expense of preparing the lease, but that not having got possession of the land in time to till it, he declined to become the tenant or perfect his recognisance. He was in custody since the 10th instant, and in his affidavit he stated that being an infirm old man, upwards of seventy years of age, he believed that further confinement would endanger his life.
  Mr. Henderson, who appeared for the receiver, said that Huggin might have entered into possession of the land but for his own neglect in not perfecting his recognisance, and that the land was lying waste since the beginning of the year. However, the receiver had no wish to deal harshly with the prisoner.
  Master of the Rolls——Is the land worth this rent——2l. an acre?
  Mr. Vance——I believe it is considered too high.
  Master of the Rolls——The difficulty is, that a year's rent is lost; the tenant should have come in and asked to be discharged from the tenancy. Let him now be released from custody on paying 6l. as the costs of this motion, and he must forfeit the sum he gave the receiver for the leases.

Source: Northern Whig, 7 October 1852. "Dungannon Agricultural Society," re: Samuel Huggins. Online at the British Newspaper Archive, www.british-newspaperarchive.co.uk (accessed 2015-11-19, by subscription). Transcribed by Alison Kilpatrick.

Dungannon Agricultural Society.
  The ninth annual exhibition of live stock and farm produce, in connexion with the Dungannon Agricultural Society, took place in Dungannon, on Wednesday, the 29th ultimo. As usual, the arrangements of the show yard, under the superintendence of the active Assistant-Secretary, Mr. George Moon, were admirably designed and effectively carried out. The attendance was very considerable, and the presence of a large number of ladies, throughout the greater portion of the day (which was extremely favorable), added considerably to the animated and interesting appearance of the scene. Over the Scotch-street entrance to the yard a purple flag floated, bearing the mottoes "Agriculture" and "Speed the Plough" on either side. Owing to the epidemic which at present prevails, no large portion of stock was exhibited. There were some very fine bulls and cows shewn, however, and the improvement in the farmers' class was still more marked than on the last occasion, demonstrating the utility and successful operation of the Society. ...
[Transcriber's note: The article continues with a description of pigs and root crops.]

The Dinner.
  At six o'clock upwards of sixty gentlemen sat down to an excellent and substantial dinner at Mr. Lilburn's Hotel. The room was tastefully ornamented with evergreens and flowers, and the figure of a plough, accurately formed in gas jets, was suspended over the table at which the Chairman sat.
  Robert Evans, Esq., occupied the Chair, and Walter Hore, Esq., the Vice-Chair. Immediately in the neighbourhood of the Chairman and Vice-Chairman, and in other parts of the room, we observed:——Francis J. Gervais, Esq., J.P.; Cecil Robert Wray, Esq., J.P.; John Cranston, Esq., J.P.; Robert W. Newton, Esq., Coalisland; James Shiel, Esq., jun., Killymeal; —— Cranston, Esq., Downpatrick; Gisborne Horner, Esq., Killeshall; Thomas H. Harpur, Esq., Gorestown; George Slevin, Esq., Dungannon; Thomas Irwin, Esq., M.D., Ballyhallaghan; William M'Neice, Esq., M.D., Tullyallen; Joseph M'Clelland, Esq., Messrs. Joseph Patterson, Jackson Byers, George Moon, David Mitchell, Robert Mullan, Davis Moon, Samuel Corrigan, Wm. Bates, Peter Hughes, John Palmer, Dawson Hazleton, John Wilson, Samuel Huggins, &c., &c.

Transcriber's note: The remainder of this article is devoted to the toasts made and prizes awarded to competitors.

Source: Belfast Morning News, 26 September 1859. "Isabella Devenny," and "Caution," by S.C. Huggins re: Mrs. Isabella Devenny. Digital copy online at the British Newspaper Archive, www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk (accessed 2015-12-19, by subscription). Transcribed by Alison Kilpatrick.

Isabella Devenny.
Main Street, Strabane,
  Begs to announce to her Customers and the Public that she purposes Removing to that House formerly occupied by Mr. James Snodgrass, and is now Selling off her Stock of Haberdashery and Fancy Goods at very reduced Prices, and will also Sell her Interest in the House she now occupies.

CAUTION.
  I beg to inform the Public that Mrs. Isabella Devenny, Main Street, Strabane, has no Interest whatever in the House she now occupies; and I hereby caution any person against Purchasing Shop Fixtures from her without first consulting me.
S.C. Huggins.
Dungannon, 20th Sept., 1859.

Source: Belfast News-Letter, 29 November 1862. "Samuel P. Higgins v. Durham." Digital copy online at the British Newspaper Archive, www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk (accessed 2016-01-03, by subscription). Transcribed by Alison Kilpatrick.

Court of Queen's Bench—Dublin, Nov. 27.
Samuel P. Higgins [sic] v. Andrew Durham.
  This was an action brought to recover the sum of £40, for the board and lodging of two of the defendant's children for a period of about six months.
  Messrs. Macdonagh, Q.C., and J. Hamilton were for plaintiff; Messrs. Joy and Harrison for defendant.
  From the evidence given it appeared that about 1842 the defendant, who is a medical gentleman, married the daughter of respectable family, named Crozier, who resided in Dungannon, and, having received an appointment in India, he proceeded to that country. He remained there for a lengthened period, and four children were born of the marriage——two sons and two daughters. In June, 1856, the plaintiff, who had been in the employment of an attorney, married a younger daughter of Mrs. Crozier, and in the course of the same year Dr. Durham sent his two little girls over to this country (their mother being dead), in order that they might be educated, the climate of India not proving suitable except for adults. In 1856, Dr. Durham remitted a sum of £70, in a letter addressed to Mrs. Higgins, who was then married, but of which fact he was not then apprised, and in September a further sum of £50 to Mrs. Crozier, with a request that none of it should be received by the plaintiff and his wife.
  The case upon which the plaintiff relied was, that Mrs. Crozier was an infirm and paralysed lady, who had only an income of about £6 a-year, and that in point of fact the two children of the defendant were boarded and lodged by Mr. Higgins, and that he was not paid any part of the moneys remitted from India; that although not married to Miss Crozier when the £70 was transmitted, the fact of his engagement to the young lady was then known to Dr. Durham, who subsequently congratulated her upon her marriage, and that the defendant never intended his children to remain with a feeble old lady like their grandmother, but with their aunt. Dr. Durham only returned from India recently, and any delay in bringing the action was accounted for by that fact.
  For the defendant it was insisted that there never had been any contract, either express or implied, with Mr. Higgins or his wife, and that he had sent a most ample provision for the maintenance of his two little girls——namely, £80 a-year. Indeed, the sufficiency of the allowance was not controverted; and the main question was, had the contract been made with their grandmother, or had there been the assent of their father to the placing them with the plaintiff's family. It was also made a matter of controversy as to whether in point of fact the occupancy of the house in Dungannon was that of Mr. Higgins or of his mother-in-law.
  Judge O'Brien charged the jury, who found a verdict for the defendant, with 6d costs.

Transcriber's note: To clarify the relationship between Samuel Carson Huggins' wife and Mrs. Durham, herewith a transcript of a marriage notice from the 7th May 1842 edition of The Northern Standard (Monaghan):

  May 2, by the Rev. J. Collins, A. Durham, Esq., M.D., of the East India Company's Service, to Mary, eldest daughter of John Crozier, Esq., M.D., of Mullaghmore, near Caledon, county Tyrone.

(Transcribed by Alison Kilpatrick, from the microfilm).

Source: Belfast News-Letter, 1 December 1862. "Huggins v. Durham," re: Samuel C. Huggins v. Andrew Durham. Digital copy online at the British Newspaper Archive, www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk (accessed 2016-01-03, by subscription). Transcribed by Alison Kilpatrick.

Huggins v. Durham.
To the Editor of the Belfast News-Letter.
  Sir––In the report of the case of Huggins v. Durham, in this day's News-Letter, it is stated that "from the evidence it appeared that, ... in 1856, Dr. Durham remitted a sum of £70 in a letter addressed to Mrs. Huggins, who was then married, but of which fact he was not then apprised."
  No such evidence as this was given at all; and it is, in fact, contradicted in the next paragraph, where it is stated that "he (the plaintiff) was not paid any of the moneys remitted from India——that, although not married to Miss Crozier when the £70 was transmitted, the fact of the engagement to the young lady was then known to Dr. Durham, who subsequently congratulated her on her marriage."
  The evidence given was, that, in March, 1856, the defendant sent his mother-in-law a sum of £70, which was entirely disposed of by her in paying debts she had previously contracted——that when she and her grandchildren went to reside with the plaintiff, she was totally unfit to take care of herself, and that she had not sixpence in her possession——that the plaintiff never received a penny for the support of defendant's children during the six months they lived with him——and this was not controverted.
  As to the contract, the defendant's letter of the 3rd July, 1856, to the plaintiff's wife was given in evidence, and in which the defendant stated, "I will send you £80 a-year for my children, so long as they will be with you." Defendant, in his evidence, admitted that, before he wrote this letter, he had been informed that his mother-in-law had been stricken with paralysis, and that, five months before he wrote it, he heard of the plaintiff's engagement to his sister-in-law. The defendant's letter of the 26th September, 1856, was also given in evidence, in which letter the defendant enclosed a draft for £51 12s, and directed Mrs. Crozier not to let any of the money into the hands of Mr. or Mrs. Huggins, and which command was obeyed to the letter.
  For the plaintiff, it was insisted that the defendant's letter of July formed the contract, and that his letter of the 7th August was a ratification of the contract.
  As to the occupancy of the house in Dungannon, there could not have been the shadow of a question about it, as the plaintiff distinctly proved, by documentary evidence, that he was the occupier of the house.
  For the defendant, it was insisted that the defendant's letter of July did not contain any contract with the plaintiff or his wife, because the defendant was not aware of the marriage when he wrote it; and that, because the defendant had sent £70 in March, which was spent by his mother-in-law two months before she was in any way connected with the plaintiff; and that, because the defendant had sent £51 12s to his mother-in-law in September, with a request that none of it should be received by plaintiff or his wife, the supposition was that defendant had sent ample means to support his children; and that, therefore, the defendant was not bound, legally or morally, to pay the plaintiff the sum he then sought for.
  Part of Mr. Justice O'Brien's charge to the jury was that, if the grandmother had died, the plaintiff might then have taken the children under his protection; and that, in such case, the defendant would be bound to pay for their support. Now, it was in evidence before him, as clearly as that two and two make four, that the woman was unfit to take care of herself. This fact was admitted by the defendant, and the defendant's attorney swore that up to the present moment she is both mentally and physically incapable. In fact, she was, when the plaintiff took her and defendant's children under his protection, as unfit to take care of herself or any one else as an Egyptian mummy two thousand years old.——Your obedient servant, S.C. Huggins.
Dungannon, November 29, 1862.

... after which, appeared the following in the "To Correspondents" section of the 5th December edition of the Belfast News-Letter:

  Huggins v. Durham.——We must decline to insert the letter of Mr. Huggins on this case, containing, as it does, assertions for which we could not hold ourselves responsible.

Source: Belfast Morning News, 14 October 1863. Birth notice, son [William] of S.C. Huggins. Digital copy online at the British Newspaper Archive, www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk (accessed 2015-12-19, by subscription). Transcribed by Alison Kilpatrick.

Birth.——October 12, at Dungannon, the wife of S.C. Huggins, Esq., of a son.

Source: Tyrone Constitution, 28 October 1864. "Tyrone Revision Sessions," re: Saml. Carson Huggins. Digital copy online at the British Newspaper Archive, www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk (accessed 2015-12-19, by subscription). Transcribed by Alison Kilpatrick.

Tyrone Revision Sessions.
  These sessions have been brought to a close in the various districts of the county without opposition, and have attracted but little attention.
Borough of Dungannon.
  At the revision of the list of voters for the borough, a good deal of interest was excited, owing to the fact of Mr. John Rea attending to sustain a number of objections to names of parties appearing on the Town Clerk's list, at the instigation of a Mr. Saml. Carson Huggins, of Dungannon, whose name also appeared on the list as that of Samuel Carson Higgins. Mr. Newton appeared for the parties whose names were objected to; and on the name of the first being called, he drew the attention of the Court to the fact that the notice of objection was signed by the name of Samuel Carson Huggins whereas the name appearing on the list was that of Samuel Carson Higgins, and that consequently, Mr. Higgins had no locus standi. After a lengthened argument on both sides, the Court overruled Mr. Newton's objection. Mr Newton then further objected to the notice on the ground that Mr. Higgins' name not appearing on the existing register of voters for the borough, he had no right to serve a notice of objection, and that the fact of his name appearing on the Town Clerk's list, then under revision, did not give him that right. It appears the English Reform Act is plain on this point, that no person can serve a notice of objection unless he is at the time of serve on the existing registry. The Irish Act is the same so far as the county registry is concerned, but as to the borough, the Act is not at all clear on the subject, the result of which was that it afforded an opportunity for the gentlemen on both sides to display their legal acumen, and the greater portion of the day was taken up with arguments on this point, after which the Chairman gave a very lucid judgement [sic], holding the Legislature, contemplated, while framing the Irish Act, to make it correspond with the English one, and that therefore, Mr. Huggins was not in a position to serve a notice of objection. Mr Rea asked for time to consider whether he would appeal, the decision having taken him by surprise. The Chairman informed him that he would afford him an opportunity of doing so any time during the evening.
  The lists were then gone into and allowed, save in the instance of a few persons whose names appeared on the Chairman's List, but who had failed to claim to be rated, and were struck out, although in occupation over twelve months.
  Mr. Rea then announced that his client would not appeal from any of the rulings or decisions of the Court, and the proceedings terminated.

Source: Tipperary Vindicator, 6 October 1865. Death notice for Mary, relict of Samuel C. Huggins (d.1850), Dungannon. Online at the British Newspaper Archive, www.british-newspaperarchive.co.uk (accessed 2015-11-19, by subscription). Transcribed by Alison Kilpatrick.

Died.——At Castle Hill, Dungannon, Mary, relict of the late Samuel C. Huggins, Esq.

Source: Derry Journal, 20 December 1865. Death notice for Samuel C. Huggins (b.1825), Dungannon. Online at the British Newspaper Archive, www.british-newspaperarchive.co.uk (accessed 2015-11-19, by subscription). Transcribed by Alison Kilpatrick.

Died.——December 15, at 154, Rathmines Road, Dublin, of typhus fever, Mr. Samuel C. Huggins, of Dungannon, aged 36 years.

Source: Belfast News-Letter, 27 March 1876. "Bazaar in Aid of the Ulster Eye, Ear, and Throat Hospital," re: Miss Huggins, Dungannon. Online at the British Newspaper Archive, www.british-newspaperarchive.co.uk (accessed 2015-11-19, by subscription). Transcribed by Alison Kilpatrick.

Bazaar in Aid of the Ulster Eye, Ear, and Throat Hospital.
  The Secretary begs to acknowledge the following Additional Contributions: [from several ladies who, in turn, collected from others] ... Received for the table of Miss Huggins, Dungannon——Miss Huggins, £1; Mrs. Morrell, 10s; Miss Holmes, 10s; T.H. Akin, Esq., 10s; Mrs. Walker, 10s; sums under 10s, £2 10s 6d; total, £5 10s 6d. ...

Source: Belfast News-Letter, 24 April 1878. "Bazaar in Dungannon," re: Miss Huggins. Online at the British Newspaper Archive, www.british-newspaperarchive.co.uk (accessed 2015-11-19, by subscription). Transcribed by Alison Kilpatrick.

Bazaar in Dungannon.
  Yesterday, a bazaar in aid of the buildings connected with the First Dungannon Presbyterian Church Sabbath-chool [sic], was held in the Courthouse, and was in every respect a great success. The house was very tastefully decorated with laurels and evergreens by Mr. Morton Forrester, Dungannon Park, assisted by his men. The arms of the Mid-Ulster Artillery Militia were hung over the magisterial bench, and altogether the house presented a most attractive appearance. The band of this regiment was present, under the leadership of Mr. Byrne, and played selections at intervals. The bazaar was open from 12 o'clock noon till 4.30 in the afternoon, and was resumed from 7 till 10 o'clock in the evening. The attendance throughout the day was large and fashionable. The tables, seven in number, were nicely arranged around the house. Each was covered over and curtained at either side. Such a choice and varied assortment of goods has seldom been seen in one room at one time. The display was not only very large, but costly. As an indication of its extent, it may be mentioned that one table contained over £70 worth, and one lady received nearly 100 articles. No wonder that the sales effected were numerous, as it was impossible not to highly appreciate the skill and taste of the donors, amongst whom were many ladies belonging to the Irish Church. Indeed, a considerable number of things were sold before the bazaar opened. The goods included many superior articles, which deserve special notice. Amongst these was a magnificent picture screen, 6ft. x 8ft. (four leaves) made by Mrs. Compton, and shown at her table; a beautiful fire screen, displayed at Mrs. Morell's table; a card table, and some very handsome foot-stools, at Mrs. Dickson's table; and a large number of valuable cushions, &c. The chief success must be attributed to the ladies, who all were most assiduous in catering for their tables during the past few weeks, and whose efforts to dispose of the goods met with the reward they deserved.
  The following ladies presided at the tables:——No. 1——Mrs. Dickson, Mrs. Henry Wilson, Mrs. Walker, and Mrs. M'Geogh. No. 2——Mrs. Morell, Mrs. W. Wilson, Miss Huggins, Mrs. Langland. No. 3——Mrs. W.J. Reid, Miss Hamilton, Mrs. Johnston. No. 4——Mrs. Gray, Mrs. Black, Mrs. Smith. No. 5——Mrs Compton, Mrs. Martin, Mrs. Gill, Mrs. Reid. No. 6——Mrs. Henderson, Mrs. Huggins, Mrs. Beatty. No. 7——Mrs. Geo. Reid, Mrs. Wray, Miss Wilson.
  Mrs. Hamilton presided in the refreshment room, and the post office was in charge of three young ladies——Miss Minnie Beatty, Miss Martin, and Miss M'Adam.
  The prosperity of the above Sabbath school has already been referred to in these columns, and it is needless to say more than that it still continues, owing to the indefatigable exertions of the superintendent (Mr. F.H. Aiken), aided by a good staff of teachers. It is confidently expected that the sum realized by the bazaar will fully pay for the extensive enlargement lately made to the Sabbath-school buildings.
  The bazaar will be continued to-day (Wednesday).

Source: Derry Journal, 13 April 1892. "Law Reports ... A Strabane Case. Huggins v. M'Cafferty." Online at the British Newspaper Archive, www.british-newspaperarchive.co.uk (accessed 2015-11-19, by subscription). Transcribed by Alison Kilpatrick.

Law Reports——Dublin, Monday.
  Judge Warren sat to hear motions for the Queen's Bench and Exchequer Divisions.

A Strabane Case.
Huggins v. M'Cafferty.
  Mr. Philip White moved on behalf of the plaintiff that a civil bill decree be made a decree of the High Court of Justice. The decree, which was for £21 5s 10d and £3 costs on foot of a half-year's rent due out of land and houses near Strabane, had been obtained at the Quarter Sessions in Strabane. The defendant is a National School teacher, and holds the lands and houses from the plaintiff, who resides in Dublin.
  The application was granted.

Source: Derry Journal, 2 January 1895. Death notice for Jane Eliza Huggins. Online at the British Newspaper Archive, www.british-newspaperarchive.co.uk (accessed 2015-11-19, by subscription). Transcribed by Alison Kilpatrick.

Died.——Huggins——At the residence of her sister-in-law, 17, Prince Patrick-terrace, Dublin, Jane Eliza, last surviving daughter of the late Samuel Carson Huggins, Esq., Dungannon, aged 79 years.

Source: Derry Journal, 11 December 1899. "A. Weir, F.A.I., Auctioneer, Valuer, and Cattle Salesman, Strabane," re: Mr. S.C. Huggins. Online at the British Newspaper Archive, www.british-newspaperarchive.co.uk (accessed 2015-11-19, by subscription). Transcribed by Alison Kilpatrick.

A. Weir, F.A.I.,
Auctioneer, Valuer, and Cattle Salesman, Strabane. ...
  Friday, 22nd December——Ten o'clock, Letting, at Spout-road, Strabane, for Mr. S.C. Huggins; ...
  For further particulars and conditions of Sale, apply to
John Elliott, Solicitor.
A. Weir, Auctioneer.
Strabane, 7th December, '99.

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